Tech Tip: F150 No Crank, No Start

Tech Tip: F-150 No Crank, No Start

A 2010 F-150 has a DTC P0690 with an intermittent stalling, no-crank, no-start condition.

The Vehicle: 2010 Ford F-150, 4WD, V8-5.4L, Flex Fuel, Automatic Transmission/Transaxle

Mileage: 136,009

Problem: The vehicle was towed in because, although the engine would crank, it would not start. After sitting for a few minutes, the engine would start and run fine for a while then shut off and would not restart.

Diagnostic Details: The technician connected a scan tool and pulled diagnostic trouble code (DTC) P0690 – Electronic control module (ECM) / powertrain control module (PCM) power relay sense circuit high.

NOTE: DTC P0690 sets when the voltage to the ignition switch position run (ISP-R) and the fuel injector power monitor (INJPWR) voltage readings do not correspond for a calibrated amount of time. The ISP-R is fed by fuse #53 (5 Amp). The voltage for INJPWRM is provided by the fuel pump relay from fuse #27 (20 Amp). Both fuses are in the battery junction box (BJB).

The technician checked technical service bulletins (TSBs) for this truck in ALLDATA and found one that mentioned that a problem with fuse #27 could cause a crank, no start and stalling problem. The problem is fixed by installing a special updated fuse holder (TSB: 15-0137, dated 09-02-15).

The technician followed the diagnostic directions in the TSB and found the fuse contacts for fuse #27 were burned on one side, leaving only 10.5 volts to power up the fuel injectors and fuel pump.

Confirmed Repair: The technician installed the new fuse holder (part# EL3Z-14293-A). After that, the engine started every time and did not stall on a lengthy test drive. Fixed!

Reprinted with permission from ALLDATA

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