10 Tips for Daily Brake Lathe Maintenance

10 Tips for Daily Brake Lathe Maintenance

Like any equipment, your brake lathes need regular care and maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. Keep your brake lathe running smoothly by following these 10 daily tips.

Like any equipment, your brake lathes need regular care and maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. Keep your brake lathe running smoothly by following these 10 daily tips. 

Important: Before making any inspection, adjustment or repair, disconnect the power source and lock out all moving parts to prevent injury. Always wear protective clothing and eye protection when making adjustments or repairs.

1. Keep your brake lathe and work area clean. 

2. Inspect the machine daily to make sure all systems are operating normally. 

3. Check for worn, damaged or missing parts, including grips and protective covers. Replace them before using the machine. 

4. Make sure all fasteners are securely tightened and all guards and covers are properly in place. 

5. Check for missing or damaged safety decals. Replace as needed with new ones from the manufacturer. 

6. Check the oil level and fill as needed.

7. Brush clean all adapters and exposed machine surfaces. Wipe them with WD-40 or equivalent to clean and protect against rust.

8. Never use compressed air to remove dirt and debris from the lathe. This could cause chips and dust to be driven between machined parts and into bearings, resulting in undue wear. The airborne chips and dust could also injure people in the area. 

9. Keep the arbor free of any foreign material on every setup. 

10. Keep burrs and chips out of the bottom of the tool bit holder and the slot where the tool bit holder mounts. 

For more information, visit bendpak.com.

BendPak, Inc.
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Phone: 805-933-9970Fax: 805-933-9160

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